Kangaroo Carry Holsters

   07.28.14

Kangaroo Carry Holsters

Kangaroo Carry holsters combine belly band and shoulder holster concepts. Made of cotton and equipped with a suspender strap, they make hot weather carry more comfortable than with synthetic bellybands that depend purely on pressure around the torso for positioning.

Draw!
Draw!

The draw is fairly similar to the shoulder holster, with the left elbow staying high and out of the muzzle path.

Bang!
Bang!

The holsters come in three pouch sizes, two colors, and eight band sizes to accommodate anything from a hobbit to a full-grown Viking, and anything from a P32 to an M1911.

Kel-tec PF9 shown in the largest variant, Air Marshal 3. The same pouch would hold an M1911.
Kel-tec PF9 shown in the largest variant, Air Marshal 3. The same pouch would hold an M1911.

A seam ripper can open the tapered pouch to hold a pistol with a weapon light attached. Large plated safety pins are included for reversing the adjustment. Single-stack magazines or revolver speed strips go into a right-side pocket.

It fits closely under fairly tight outfits.
It fits closely under fairly small outfits. Here, a PMR30 with 30-round magazine is carried under a tight business jacket.

With sweaters, the hem can be moved up for drawing under it. With shirts, either ripping the buttons or pulling the collar wider gains access from the top. One-hand access is possible but slower.

Bulldog in .44 Special in action
Bulldog in .44 Special in action.

While the photo show it in use by women, the design appears to fit men more closely, as there’s no bust to get in the way of the cross-draw. Kangaroo Carry web site has several videos showing how to deploy from this rig efficiently and safely.

Advantages: low-profile, comfortable in hot weather, lightweight, easy to deploy seated in a vehicle. Disadvantages: benefits from two hands for speedy access, re-holstering is slow.

Overall, a good design for people who cannot use a conventional belt or pocket holster for reasons of professional dress, being in vehicles much of the time, or being in close proximity to others in restrictive environments.

Read More