HCA Double Barrel Model MC Muzzleloading Pistol

   07.11.16

HCA Double Barrel Model MC Muzzleloading Pistol

When local gunsmith George Halstead decided to build another double-barreled muzzleloading pistol, he opted to make it nicer than his own–and to give it to his sister. He even got hold of a nice wooden box and made a custom-fitted presentation case for it.

Right side of HCA's model MC pistol. Photo © Russ Chastain
Right side of HCA’s model MC pistol.
Photo © Russ Chastain

Unlike the prototype, this one has powder coated barrels and polished bronze fittings, and each grip panel has an indian head nickel inlaid into it.

Like his prototype, it is a smoothbore with a pair of barrels, but only one hammer to fire them.

Left side of HCA model MC. These grips are newly made, but have been embellished and stained to make them appear like bone. Photo © Russ Chastain
Left side of HCA model MC. These grips are newly made, but have been embellished and stained to make them appear like bone.
Photo © Russ Chastain

The front sights are bronze blades soldered to the barrel band.

Top view of HCA model MC. Photo © Russ Chastain
Top view of HCA model MC.
Photo © Russ Chastain

The front part of the hammer can pivot from side to side when the hammer is cocked, to allow it to hit the right or left nipple. So the same hammer works both barrels.

Speaking of barrels, they are made of 4140 cold roll steel. They’re about 4 inches long and are bored to about .44 caliber.

The MC model is engraved with M.S.C. on the bottom, and U.S.A. on the top. Photo © Russ Chastain
The MC model is engraved with M.S.C. on the bottom, and U.S.A. on the top.
Photo © Russ Chastain

I call this the Model MC because it was made (and specially engraved) for Maureen Chase.

Hammer cocked and rotated to fire the right barrel. Receiver plate stamped HCA (Halstead Custom Arms). Photo © Russ Chastain
Hammer cocked and rotated to fire the right barrel. Receiver plate stamped HCA (Halstead Custom Arms).
Photo © Russ Chastain

 

George calls the grip finish "buffalo bone," but he cast these grips himself in his workshop. Photo © Russ Chastain
George calls the grip finish “buffalo bone,” but he cast these grips himself in his workshop.
Photo © Russ Chastain

The “cracked bone” appearance was made on purpose to add character to the grips. Rust–yes, rust–was used to stain the polymer to give it an older appearance.

The arrow points to an itty-bitty spring loaded pin that retains the ramrod. A small tool is included to depress that pin to remove the ramrod. Photo © Russ Chastain
The arrow points to an itty-bitty spring loaded pin that retains the ramrod. A small tool is included to depress that pin to remove the ramrod.
Photo © Russ Chastain

Halstead made this ramrod from an old brass candlestick.

The HCA Model MC is about 8 inches long, 4 inches high, and weighs in at 1.60 pounds (25.6 ounces). Caliber is .44 and the barrels are smoothbore–but who’s gonna use this little jewel for target practice anyhow?

Accessories with the Model MC include a couple old round balls, a powder measure, and the little tool for releasing the ramrod. Photo © Russ Chastain
Accessories with the Model MC include a couple old round balls, a powder measure, and the little tool for releasing the ramrod.
Photo © Russ Chastain

HCA’s price for a gun like this one is $450, which is plenty cheap considering all the hours he puts into them and their uniqueness. And he will also offer a single-barrel model for $300. For more info, contact:

Halstead Custom Arms
George Halstead
352-546-3731
23455 NE 160 Avenue Road
Fort McCoy, FL 32134

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