Videoing Own Hunts New Trend

   10.30.17

Videoing Own Hunts New Trend

It should not be that surprising given today’s advanced technologies that hunters are taking to videoing their own hunts. Mostly, this is done for the sheer fun of it, but these videographer hunters are also capturing precious memories of their experiences, family, friends, hunting camp activities and everything else. These videos have become the new format of photo albums.

This trend has been substantiated by a hunter survey conducted by Southwick Associates’ HunterSurvey.com. Southwick Associates is a well-known national market research and economics firm that conducts regular surveys for hunting, shooting, sportfishing, and outdoor recreation markets. Online surveys are conducted on a monthly basis to glean all sorts of data about endless issues related to these outdoor pursuits.

A Southwick Associates’ survey of hunters revealed that over the past five years, there has been a 68 percent increase of hunters who have engaged in videoing some or all of their hunts. Some thirty percent have been doing this for more than five years, while 26 percent have been doing it for one or two years. An additional 21 percent just started videoing their hunts during the past year.

How often do these hunters conduct their own videos of their hunts? Thirty percent take video on every hunt or very frequently. Another 31 percent collect video footage roughly half the time they hunt. The remainder do it only occasionally.

Certainly the ease and availability of quality video cameras (even those in smart phones) has helped facilitate the collection of hunting activities by hunters. Heck, these days, nearly everything from car wrecks to outdoor cookouts are videoed. So why not hunting trips, days in camp, fishing excursions, or anything outdoors?

Video-capable cameras can be mounted on hunting caps, the barrels of guns, on hunting stands, or tripods in shooting houses. With widespread availability of wireless signals, real-time video clips can easily be posted/shared online if the user wants that exposure. The possibilities are endless.

Videoing hunts is also a terrific way to collect valuable family historical accounts. It is also just plain fun to see the results of video action of wildlife, and camp life as well. So, if you have not yet taken up videoing your own hunts, you might want to follow this growing trend.

Avatar Author ID 67 - 1616738299

Award winning outdoor writer/photographer since 1978. Over 3000 articles and columns published nationally. Field & Stream Hero of Conservation in 2007. Fields of writing includes hunting most game in American, Canada, and Europe, fishing fresh and saltwater, destination travel, product reviews, industry consulting, and conservation issues. Currently VP at largest community college in Mississippi in economic development and workforce training with 40 years of experience in Higher Education. BS-MS in wildlife sciences from MO. University, and then a PhD in Industrial Psychology. Married with two children and Molly the Schnoodle.

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