Three Things That Can Help You Survive a Nuclear War

   01.09.18

Three Things That Can Help You Survive a Nuclear War

Many of us are worried about a war with North Korea spiraling out of control and turning into a wider nuclear exchange. I know I am, and I’ve taken steps to prepare. In this short post, I’ll tell you about three nuclear-specific preps that form the core of my nuclear survival plan.

Note that this stuff isn’t cheap, but it could save your life.

Radiator Detector and Dosimeter

You can get cheap Geiger counters on Amazon, but don’t rely on one of those to work in the aftermath of a nuclear attack. Most Geiger counters are designed to track much lower levels of radiation than what you’ll see in the aftermath of a war.

That’s why I’ve bet my life and that of my family on the NukeAlert ER. (Note: I and/or this website have no relationship with anyone who makes or sells these.) The NukeAlert ER is a combination Geiger counter, survey meter, and dosimeter, and it’s specifically designed to keep you out of harm’s way in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation.

At $750, it’s very expensive. But look at it this way: many of you have spent at least that much buying guns in the past two years.

This device is the core of my nuclear preps, and I wouldn’t be without it. In fact, I’ll probably buy a second one before the year is out, as a backup.

If you don’t want to spring for the big one, you can get a stripped-down NukeAlert from Amazon for $140.

Potassium Iodide tablets

You can find potassium iodide tablets all over Amazon. You’d better stock up on them now, because the minute things look serious they will sell out quickly. I’ve seen them sell out before, and I’ve no doubt I’ll see them sell out again.

These tablets protect you by keeping your thyroid gland from absorbing radioactive particles, so you’ll want these for yourself and your loved ones.

Nuclear War Survival Skills

Do yourself a favor and pick up a copy of the classic Nuclear War Survival Skills.

There are different schools of thought on just how survivable a full-scale nuclear exchange is, but it pays to read this classic which argues that such an event is survivable and tells you how.

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