SureCan Gas Can Review, Mossy Oak Edition

   07.30.18

SureCan Gas Can Review, Mossy Oak Edition

When I got the chance to check out the Mossy Oak edition of the new SureCan Gas Can, I happily accepted. Government intrusion into gas can construction has led to some incredibly moronic and difficult-to-use fuel cans. The SureCan attempts to change all that, and I think they did a pretty good job. Plus they’re made right here in the good ol’ USA.

The biggest difference between the SureCan and just about every other gas can out there is that it dispenses fuel from the bottom rather than the top. So you’re not tipping the can or having to hold it at varying angles for extended periods of time, etc.

You simply uncap the flexible spout, rotate it down and put it into your fuel tank, then press the thumb lever. The lever opens a valve for the spout while simultaneously venting the can to allow air in, and fuel begins to flow from the spout.

SureCan Gas Can
While fueling up my Power King tractor, I don’t even have to hold the can. It rests on top of the (cold) engine while I depress the thumb lever. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

The fuel flows from the cans quickly — so you really need to be careful. If you don’t keep an eye on the level in your fuel tank, you can overfill a tank, and unlike traditional gas cans, you can’t just tip it back to stop the flow. After you release the lever, there’s still gas in the black plastic spout and it will continue to flow out until the spout is empty.

In other words, release the lever before your tank is full.

SureCan Gas Can
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

It’s nice to be able to set the tank down while you dispense the fuel. While fueling up a UTV, I can keep one hand free to shine a light into the tank to ensure it doesn’t overflow.

SureCan Gas Can
I can gas up this UTV without straining to hold a heavy gas can and keeping one hand free to shine a light into the tank. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

It gets tricky when filling machines with small tanks, such as pressure washers. You must know when to release the lever to avoid overflowing. Whenever a small tank is almost full and you’re tempted to give it “just a little more to finish filling it,” don’t. You will usually overflow the tank.

SureCan Gas Can
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

The red plastic cans themselves are made of strong, durable material and look as if they will last a good long time. The filler caps are large and easy to use, and provide ample room for a gas pump nozzle when you’re filling them up.

The thumb levers are pretty easy to use, but the lock can be a little tricky. If you press down on the lever even a little while attempting to unlock it, the lock won’t move.

And now for the bad stuff, of which there ain’t much. Mainly, I question its long-term durability. The flexible spout is exposed to hits, and any moving part on any equipment can cause problems. They do sell replacement spouts, levers, etc if you have trouble.

My biggest gripe about the SureCan gas can — which I really do like, don’t get me wrong — is that the little end caps for the spouts are a pain. They’re made like the old “childproof” push-down-and-turn medicine bottle caps, and sometimes it’s a hassle to cap and uncap the spout. And you do need to have it capped.

I’ve also had the cap come out of the tether before, which seems avoidable by using a longer tether on the 5-gallon model, or a better attachment method between tether and cap.

SureCan Gas Can
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

You won’t be able to dispense all of the gas in the can through the spout; it’s just not designed that way. Some fuel will remain in the SureCan unless you pour it out of the filler neck.

I used both the 5-gallon and 2+-gallon cans, and both are good. Make note that, when you actually put a full five gallons into the larger model, it’s filled riiiight to the bottom of the filler neck.

SureCan Gas Can
Five gallons fills it right to the rim. (Photo © Russ Chastain)

While retail prices for the SureCan can be quite steep — I’ve seen prices as high as $63 for the 5-gallon model, but recently saw them at a certain warehouse club for $35 — for now, they are offering one of the best ways to fill your fuel tanks.

They offer these cans in red for gasoline, yellow for diesel, and blue for kerosene. They have a racing model (which appears to just have different-colored spout, lids, and lever) and the Mossy Oak model you see here. If you’re interested in buying this camo model from the manufacturer, check out the 5-gallon one here ($54.95) and the 2+ model here ($39.95).

I have several different types of gas cans, but the first ones to be used after filling are my SureCans. I reckon that says it all.

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