Fix It Sticks Torque Driver Kit Review

   10.06.20

Fix It Sticks Torque Driver Kit Review

The tool kit comes in a handy little zipper case.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

Way back in 2016, I ran across a handy-dandy little tool kit called “Fix It Sticks” and told y’all about it. The brand has grown over the past few years, and I was able to get my hands on their Torque Driver Kit for some test and review, so let’s get to it.

Fix It Sticks Torque Driver kit, closed. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
Fix It Sticks Torque Driver kit, closed.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

First, some specs on the kit:

  • 3-way T-Handle wrench with knurled black spinner
  • Torque Driver which requires no presetting (15-65 inch lbs)
  • Includes 1/2″ Socket with 1/4″ bit adapter
  • Includes 15 bits (1 P1 Philips, 1 flat blade marked “5”, 4 Torx (T10,T15,T20,T25), 5 standard hex (5/64,3/32,1/8,5/32,3/16), and 4 metric hex (2.5mm,3mm,4mm,5mm).
  • Can be used with any 1/4″ drive hex bits
  • Black zippered case with Molded Holder
  • Weight: 12.9 ounces / 0.81 pound
  • Dimensions of closed case: 3.5″x5″x1-1/4″ thick
  • Made in Taiwan
  • MSRP for the kit: $112 (torque driver alone MSRP $60)
You could fit some more bits in the back of this case. The zipper case is made in China. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
You could fit some more bits in the back of this case. The zipper case is made in China.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

It’s a simple tool, which often means the best kind of tool. The T handle has a black knurled spinner you can hold while using the T wrench with any 1/4″-hex-drive bits, including those in the kit. The handle has 3 female hex receivers, so you can use a bit in the end of the long leg for fast turning, or place a bit in one of the short legs to apply more “oomph.”

Fix It Sticks T-Handle. The black thing is a spinner. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
Fix It Sticks T-Handle. The black thing is a spinner.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

The torque driver itself is also simple; you don’t set anything, just slip a bit into its red end, slip the T handle onto the hex extension on the other end, and tighten your fastener until the line on the bit end aligns with your desired torque value, in inch-pounds. There will be no click; you just stop when you get there, like the beam-style torque wrenches I use when I rebuild engines.

You do not need to pre-set the driver, so don’t try to twist to adjust, and never use it to loosen fasteners or turn it counter-clockwise. While we’re on the subject, never exceed 65 inch-pounds with the Fix It Sticks Torque Driver. As I said, it’s nice and simple. Just tighten to the value you need, and you’re done.

The torque driver itself is simple and easy to use. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
The torque driver itself is simple and easy to use.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

Here is a short video explaining how to use the tool, and what not to do:

I used this driver to install the Bushnell Nitro scope onto my Henry Long Ranger in 6.5 Creedmoor. I tightened the scope bases to 25 inch-pounds, which worked fine, but the hex bit from the Fix It Sticks kit was less than ideal. The bit was a loose fit in the hex screw heads. But worse than that, the bit is plated rather than made 100% of tool steel, and the plating began to flake off the bit. That’s pretty lame in a kit that retails for north of $100.

The kit includes an adapter for 1/4" drive sockets, and one socket (1/2"). (Photo © Russ Chastain)
The kit includes an adapter for 1/4″ drive sockets, and one socket (1/2″).
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

An adapter is included to allow the use of 1/4″ drive sockets; that’s a nice touch. One socket is included, it’s 1/2″ and marked with no brand.

Ready to torque something down. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
Ready to torque something down.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

Other than the bits being plated and therefore fairly useless, I have no complaints about this little tool kit. If you are simply looking for the torque driver function, I suggest you purchase that separately because I don’t judge the case, T-handle, and bits to be worth the extra $52. Chances are good you’ve already got one or more hex bit drivers anyhow, and you can use the Torque Driver in those — albeit without the extra leverage of a T-shaped handle.

Use the long leg of the T-handle to give yourself more leverage. (Photo © Russ Chastain)
Use the long leg of the T-handle to give yourself more leverage.
(Photo © Russ Chastain)

This is a nice little torque driver, and I trust its accuracy more than other small torque drivers I’ve tried. If the quality of the bits was up there with the rest of the tooling, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it even at the relatively high price… but I have a problem with plated bits. The plating invariably comes off, and when that happens you have an even looser fit than before.

My recommendation based on this experience: Buy the Fix-It-Sticks driver rather than the kit.

Avatar Author ID 61 - 1534142080

Editor & Contributing Writer Russ Chastain is a lifelong hunter and shooter who has spent his life learning about hunting, shooting, guns, ammunition, gunsmithing, reloading, and bullet casting. He started toting his own gun in the woods at age nine and he's pursued deer with rifles since 1982, so his hunting knowledge has been growing for more than three and a half decades. His desire and ability to share this knowledge with others has also grown, and Russ has been professionally writing and editing original hunting & shooting content since 1998. Russ Chastain has a passion for sharing accurate, honest, interesting hunting & shooting knowledge and stories with people of all skill levels.

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