Prepping for the 2018 Hurricane Season

   06.18.18

Hurricane season started June 1st, and it did not take long before our first storm made landfall. The rainmaker making landfall on June 18 is not even a named storm, but it should be a wake up call to the people living in hurricane prone areas.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has a standard checklist with stuff like flashlights, blankets, and medicines. This is stuff everyone should have on hand anyway. So, let’s take a few minutes and talk about some stuff FEMA doesn’t

Service the Generator

Would the reader like to know how aggravating it is after a storm has passed through, the power is out, and the generator will not crank? No matter how many times the pull rope is pulled, praying, cursing, or threats made, the stupid generator will not crank.

Generator

A lot of times the gasoline has sat for so long the it has turned bad. Sometimes trash found its way into the carburetor.

Would the reader like to know the simple solution? Service the generator before it is needed.

  • Clean the spark plug.
  • Change the fuel.
  • Drain the old fuel out of the carburetor.
  • Replace the air filter.
  • Change the oil.

Spend a few hours taking care of the generator before its needed.

Some generators have a low oil censor which will cause the generator to not crank if the oil is low.

Chainsaws

There is a very real possibility roads will be blocked by downed trees after a storm. Rather than waiting for the road crews, a lot of people take it upon themselves to make the roads passable.

Chainsaw accident

Chainsaws are a lot like generators, except the saw engine needs a mix of fuel and oil, and the chain needs a special bar oil.

Some of the chainsaw items I keep on hand:

  • Fuel.
  • 2 stroke engine oil.
  • Spare chain.
  • Bar oil.
  • Round file to sharpen the chain.
  • First ad kit.

Some of the readers may think the first aid kit was listed as a joke. The chainsaw is one of the most dangerous items found in a home. Several years ago I cut my leg open with a chainsaw. All it took was a split second of not paying attention, and my leg had a gash in it. Thankfully the injury was minor and only needed a tetanus shot and some staples.

With the roads blocks by fallen trees, a moderate injury could turn into something serious.

LED lanterns and Flashlights

Ditch the candles and kerosene lanterns for rechargeable LED lanterns and flashlights. By switching to LED lights, the chance of fire is almost eliminated.

One of the biggest dangers is children knocking over the lantern. Children today have not been raised around kerosene lanterns and may not be aware of the danger.

My aunt told me about how a kerosene lantern caught fire, granny grabbed it, ran outside and threw it in the yard. The difference between my granny and people today? Granny did not get electricity to her house until she was around 57 years old. My aunt and dad did their homework using a kerosene lantern.  Simply put, granny had used kerosene lanterns her whole life.  People today rarely use kerosene, which could pose a danger from lack of experience.

Final Thoughts

We could go on all day long about various items. Such as cooking and the effects of comfort food after a disaster.

Having some good heavy extension cords so the generator can be moved away from the house. Also, be careful not to overload the generator by plugging too many devices into it.

Blankets and pillows for people who may need to stay at your house. During Hurricane Rita and Ike, we had people sleeping on the couches, and all over the floor.

Make sure the homeowners and flood insurance policies are paid up.

Have plenty of subscription medicines on hand. After Hurricane Rita, the power stayed off for so long people ran out of the their medicines and were having to drive 100 miles to get it refilled.

Prep the best you can and stay safe.

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